Working with Released Prisoners

Stephen Dailly

ISBN: 9781909728967

196 Pages

Published Jan 2019

Latest Releases, Mission and Leadership

Paperback £8.99 Kindle £5.99
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Every year, thousands of people are released from prison and back into the community. Many of these are believers in Christ, just like you and me.

So how can we, the Church, support these brothers and sisters as they seek to transition back into society? How can we help them move forward with their faith? What unique factors do we need to be aware of and what precautions should we take?

With extensive experience in the field, the author gives profound insights into the very real difficulties released prisoners both face and present, all the while offering genuine hope. Working with Released Prisoners will encourage Christians from all backgrounds to question their own preconceptions about those coming out of prison and show them how they can make a difference to the lives of these precious sons and daughters of God.

  • Welcoming church congregations are a vital community asset that can have a powerful, redemptive influence on people coming out of prison. I’m aware of wonderful examples of lives being turned around for good from this type of ministry.

    Andrew Selous, MP for South West Bedfordshire
  • Working with Released Prisoners is a meticulous piece of work that is a much-needed guide for anyone who seeks to work with ex-prisoners. Having worked with the author of this book for fourteen years within the chaplaincy department, I watched as he steadfastly collated information and identified gaps in the system in order to halt the “revolving gate” lifestyle that becomes the norm for many prisoners. Working as I do with men in transition from incarceration to freedom, I feel that this book has hit the nail on the head, for forethought and wisdom. The clarity, which is the pattern throughout the writing, offers a wealth of practical, tried and tested methods that give an optimum outcome.

    This book is derived not only from personal experience, but also from meticulously detailed research into a subject that has haunted the writer throughout his years of working with, and caring for, ex-prisoners. His heart is in the detail. The use of Scripture throughout to illustrate the practicalities means that this is a spiritual teaching as well as being informative for the reader. The author challenges us throughout not just to be concerned for released prisoners, but to be moved to do the work the Bible teaches in difficult and challenging circumstances.

    Rev Sandie Hicks, Minister, Brightlingsea Baptist Church, Essex; former Chaplain, HMP Dovegate

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